Everything you need to know about oxalate intolerance

What are oxalates and how do they make us sick?

Calcium oxalate is a calcium salt of oxalic acid. Oxalates are microscopic calcium crystals in the plant foods we eat, though some oxalates are found in animal products we normally don’t consume, such as crab shell, for example, but can be a problem due to cross-contamination or lazy food preparation practices. Oxalates are the most acidic organic acid found in bodily fluids and, commercially, are used to remove rust from car radiators. Some foods are higher in oxalates than others — cacao, nuts, rhubarb, tea, chard, tea, soy, buckwheat, quinoa, curly kale, and spinach are all considered extremely high oxalate — while animal fats and proteins contain virtually no oxalates. Other plant foods fall elsewhere on the range — from negligible to low to medium to extremely high.

In a healthy person, oxalate-degrading bacteria in the gut are supposed to consume oxalates and digest them so that they do not end up in human tissues. While most people eat oxalates without noticing specific symptoms, oxalate poisoning is a very real occurrence and can cause immediate symptoms like burning and closing of the throat, swelling, digestive upset, coma, and even death. These cases are rare, however, and slow oxalate “poisoning” is a much more common occurrence. 

There are several bacteria responsible for breaking down oxalates in our guts: oxalobacter formigenes, lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidus. Researchers aren’t quite sure how the bacteria, oxalobacter formigenes, gets passed onto a person’s gut — is it via the birth canal, touching/hugging/kissing from family members, or a exposure to dirt and soil-based organisms? The mystery remains, but we do know that people who have oxalate intolerance often have low or non-existent levels of oxalobacter formigenes in their gut. Strangely enough, a person can also have very high levels of oxalobacter formigenes in the gut but still not tolerate oxalates. Why? Genes definitely play a role. If a person has a family history of oxalate problems, it’s likely they share a gene with their relative that would cause them to not properly digest and eliminate calcium oxalate. Urea cycle disorders, heavy metal toxicity, leaky gut syndrome, and mineral deposition issues can also play a big role. 

A person with normal gut microbiota and a person who lacks the gene mutations that cause oxalate intolerance may be able to eat high oxalate foods their entire life and never suffer ill effects. A round (or more) of antibiotics that kills oxalobacter formigenes and other healthy bacteria like Lactobacillus or Oxalobacter formigenes, however, or a stressful life event that alters hormone levels, or exposure to an environmental pollutant, or a nutrient deficiency, may suddenly switch on oxalate-associated genes and start causing problems. However, because again, oxalates are technically classified as a poison, even a healthy person with no Leaky Gut Syndrome, and no genetic mutations, and who has healthy levels of oxalobacter formigenes has a chance of being intolerant of oxalates.

Oxalates work differently than your typical “allergen” or food “sensitivity” or “intolerance”. Because oxalates have been classified as a poison, oxalate symptoms occur when you have been exposed to too much at once — just like other food chemicals. When a person is habitually eating a very high oxalate diet, they not experience symptoms but because their body is storing oxalates in the human tissues instead. True oxalate symptoms may not show up for years and years and even then may act like a “bucket effect” — where a person needs to consume a certain number of oxalates in a given meal, or day, or week, for a spillover of symptoms to occur.

Because of oxalate deposition, a person with oxalate build-up must learn how to eliminate the stored oxalates safely. Here, I use the term “oxalate intolerance” or “oxalate sensitivity” loosely. Oxalates function much differently than another kind of intolerance, like gluten or dairy, for example. However, “intolerance” and “sensitivity” are easy-to-understand ways to describe a food that causes chronic health problems but that does not always elicit immune-mediated allergic responses. Some people are intolerant to gluten but do not experience an immune reaction the way a person with celiac disease does. It is similar with oxalates — the spectrum of noticeable reactions varies, and just because a person doesn’t experience an immediate responses does not mean they are not oxalate intolerant or sensitive because so much of oxalate intolerance is “silent”, latent or not very obvious (until a person knows better).

There are three “medically acknowledged” oxalate diseases that doctors diagnose and treat: Primary hyperoxaluria which is considered a rare genetic disorder of liver metabolism that can results in life-threatening damage to the kidneys. The liver doesn’t create enough of a certain enzyme that prevents overproduction of oxalate, or the enzyme doesn’t work properly. Enteric hyperoxaluria is the second type which includes several intestinal diseases like Crohn’s disease and short bowel syndrome. Also certain surgical procedures like Bariatric surgery may increase the absorption of oxalate from foods. Dietary hyperoxaluria is the third type which is caused by eating a diet of high oxalate content foods. This can cause high levels of oxalates in the urine and can increase the risk of hyperoxaluria or kidney stones. Generally diet changes will decrease the level of oxalates in one’s urine but it takes longer to eradicate oxalates that have been stored in the tissues, which is why urine testing (such as an Organic Acids test) can be flawed. 

However, modern medicine has yet to acknowledge just how common oxalate intolerance and storage may be — and it’s connection to many common illnesses. Many people have anecdotally demonstrated that the reach of oxalates goes far beyond these seemingly rare inherited diseases. Studies prove that oxalates are known to deposit themselves in human tissues — including but not limited to: the thyroid, inner ears, skin, myofascial system, eyes, kidneys, liver, digestive tract, jaw, parathyroid, arteries.

Common oxalate intolerance symptoms and conditions:

  • Vulvodynia
  • chronic yeast/fungal infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • B vitamin deficiencies
  • muscle pain
  • joint pain
  • myofascial pain
  • calcification
  • headaches
  • Fibromyalgia
  • chronic fatigue
  • hormonal imbalances
  • leaky gut syndrome
  • autoimmunity
  • thyroid cysts
  • cloudy urine
  • kidney stones
  • kidney infections
  • cysts
  • iron deficiency
  • mineral deficiency
  • irregular blood pressure
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Autism

Common oxalate “dumping” symptoms:

  • Cloudy urine/crystals in the urine
  • Grainy or sandy stools (or changes in color of stools)
  • Skin rashes
  • Incontinence or frequent urination/urgency
  • Painful urination
  • Vaginal pain
  • Eye pain
  • Insomnia
  • Pain from previous surgery or injury sites
  • Irritability, anxiety, anger, depression
  • Lower back or abdominal pain
  • Kidney stones
  • Fatigue
  • Cravings for high oxalate foods

Again, there are tests one can order to determine if they are in fact dealing with an oxalate intolerance (an OAT). However, these tests can be flawed because oxalates go through phases of storage and elimination. One may be in a storage phase at the time of testing and therefore will not be eliminating large quantities in their urine sample, which would lead to a false negative. Great Plains Laboratory offers testing and lab values for oxalate intolerance.

Starting a low oxalate diet

It’s very easy to eat an extremely high oxalate diet of over 1,000 milligrams of oxalate per day if you are eating supposedly healthy foods like sweet potatoes, spinach, concentrated tomato sauces, whole wheat, cacao or chocolate, dates, nuts and seeds, cinnamon or curry powders, black tea, beets, and gluten-free or grain-free and dairy-free alternatives that are made with nuts and nut butters, teff, quinoa, hemp and soy. Eating extremely high oxalate is not a rare phenomenon and in fact encouraged by many popular diets such as vegan and Paleo. 

It is essential to reduce your oxalate intake very slowly. I cannot stress this enough. If you have been eating a very high oxalate diet for most of your life or you have significant health issues, this is especially important. A low oxalate diet is considered to be under about 50 mg of oxalates per day. Sometimes between 30 and 50 mg is recommended when eating “low oxalate”. Because oxalates build-up (store themselves) in human tissues, start the low oxalate diet very slowly and gradually increase the strictness to avoid a sudden “dumping” (as it’s called) of oxalates being liberated from your tissues.

For example, an average oxalate intake may average over 300 mg daily for someone who is not monitoring their intake. So decreasing very suddenly from 300+ mg of oxalates to under 50 could cause a sudden exit of oxalates that have been stored in tissues. This could result in painful symptoms for a person, including kidney stones, infection, pain, or whatever the original oxalate symptom was. You could end up feeling very sick before you start to feel better.

In my health coaching practice, I have had success with immediately reducing oxalate intake for clients dealing with chronic pain conditions like Fibromyalgia and muscle and joint pains from extremely high to high, then medium, to low over the course of several weeks or months. But in working with clients with a history of kidney stones, osteoporosis, irritable bowel syndromes, or who are in seriously poor health, I always make sure they very gradually reduce their oxalate intake.

You will need to monitor how a lowered oxalate diet is affecting you. If your oxalate “dumping” is coming on too quickly or strong (you are having a sudden flare of symptoms), you should increase your oxalate intake to stop the “dumping”. In the case of clients with a history of kidney stones, I know that causing them to “dump” too quickly could result in large or painful kidney stones, which is very important to avoid because no one wants an unplanned trip to the E.R. 

Also consider that oxalates naturally bind with minerals. So if a client comes to me with a low iron count, low magnesium, potassium, or calcium, I immediately think of oxalates. It may sound strange for low calcium to be a symptom of oxalate intolerance (because oxalate is calcium after all), but keep in mind there are different forms of calcium your body utilizes to keep blood levels in check — and calcium oxalate is not one of them.  

In addition to a lowered oxalate diet, there are also other tricks you can use to absorb fewer oxalates that you are eating, including, supplementation with calcium citrate or other minerals in the citrate form. When taken slightly prior to meals (about 5-20 minutes before), oxalic acid in the intestine combines with the citrate mineral to form insoluble calcium oxalate crystals. These crystals are then eliminated in the stools, commonly, and do not end up in the human tissues. When a person’s diet is low in calcium, soluble oxalic acid can be absorbed from the intestine into the bloodstream. In this way, it is helpful to eat dairy-rich foods if you can tolerate them, and if you have an oxalate problem — it means fewer oxalates will be absorbed by your body. The tricky part for people who have to eat dairy-free is finding non-dairy sources of plant calcium that are not high oxalate (because they almost always are) — this is why supplementation before meals can be helpful.

A common misconception is that cooking denatures or destroys oxalates. The reality is, it does not destroy oxalates and fermenting reduces oxalate content only in very few cases, but in some ways we can manipulate how we prepare foods to reduce the oxalate content. Boiling, for example, reduces the overall oxalate content of food because some will be drawn into the water.

Oxalates are also formed in the human liver. Some people experience what is called “endogenous oxalate production” which compounds an oxalate intolerance. This is where your body converts common substances like synthetic vitamin C, amino acids (like glycine), calcium or vitamin D supplements into calcium oxalate. So even if you are not eating a high oxalate food, you may be predisposed to converting non-oxalate substances into oxalate. This is purported to be caused by a vitamin deficiency like vitamin B6 as well as an interruption in the glycolate pathways caused by genetic mutations/inborn metabolism errors. If you have had your genes tested, you can look to see if you have ACAT, AGT, AGXT, SLC26A, MTRR, and ACE mutations which can contribute in various ways.

Avoiding foods rich in protein like meats and bone broths, gelatin, or synthetic vitamin C may be necessary to work around one’s oxalate intolerance/storage problem. Some species of mold or fungus like Aspergillus and Penicillium produce oxalates as well so there is reason to believe that infection by a certain pathogen can also cause oxalate production and intolerance. Supplementation with specific forms of B vitamins, such as biotin, P5P, and adenosyl or hydroxy B12 may also help.

Supplements that may help oxalate intolerance:

  • Minerals in the “citrate” form: These are generally taken 5-20 minutes before a meal to bind with the oxalates in the foods being eaten. Magnesium citrate, calcium citrate or potassium citrate are the most commonly used. Some people should not take calcium supplements, however, so magnesium may be the safest source.
    Also note that because oxalates bind with minerals, a person may be mineral deficient and need additional mineral supplementation regardless. Taking a multi-mineral supplement or using dermal magnesium chloride oil can help to reduce pain and symptoms of mineral deficiency
  • Anti-inflammatories: natural pain medications like Arnica (for muscle/joint pain caused by oxalates)
  • MSM: for muscle/joint pain.
  • Curcumin: as an anti-inflammatory. Note that turmeric is high oxalate but its active ingredients called curcumin is low oxalate. 
  • Essential oils: essential oils are used for many purposes, including everything from anxiety and depression to skin problems, sleep disturbances, infections, hormonal balance, and more. Oils generally have zero to a negligible level of oxalates so they are permitted on this diet. 
  • Vitamin B6: generally the active form called P5P is recommended over the synthetic B6 form.
  • Methylated B vitamin: your needs for this will vary depending on your gene mutations, so be sure to work with a practitioner before starting a B vitamin supplement. Low B6, B7 and B12 can contribute to oxalate intolerance. 
  • Homeopathics: homeopathics are used for various ailments and are generally considered low oxalate. Beware that homeopathic pellets often contain lactose so they are not appropriate for those with dairy allergies, or homeopathic tinctures contain alcohol so they are not appropriate for those with histamine intolerance.  
  • Humaworm for kids: this is an antiparasitic but also great for killing yeast that is associated with oxalate intolerance.
  • Oxalobacter formigenes probiotic supplement (this is not yet available on the market but projections show it should be available soon).
  • Biotin: to kill the yeast infections that oxalates can cause, or to rebuild Biotin stores as oxalate intolerance commonly causes Biotin deficiency
  • epsom salt baths to raise magnesium levels or act as a pain reliver for muscle/joint pain
  • Lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacterium lactis: they consumes 86-100 percent of oxalates in the gut even if you do not have adequate levels of Oxaloacter formigenes.
  • High-quality molecularly distilled fish oils: for the vitamins A, D, E, and K content, which aide in oxalate elimination in the bowels
  • Chondroitin sulfate: may help prevent the formation of calcium oxalate crystals
  • Digestive enzymes and supports: including betaine, protease, lipase, amylase, and possibly ox bile to stimulate digestion and bile production to stop oxalate absorption in the gut
  • Taurine: (if low in the plasma upon testing, which is common) to stimulate bile salt production to reduce oxalate absorption
  • Vitamin E and selenium: they have been shown to reduce oxalate damage
  • Arginine: to prevent oxalate deposition in the tissues

As with any diet or supplement changes, you must speak with your healthcare provider before making any changes. You do not want to guess as to which supplements you need or how much oxalate to reduce in your diet upon starting a lowered oxalate diet. It is truly that serious. 

Ready to reclaim your health and self? Click here to learn more about Nutrition Consultations, Energy Readings, and Body Readings. 

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You’re only as healthy as the life force of your food

Despite being told we “don’t know” why diseases happen or they only happen as a result of a shitty genetic Russian roulette, the truth is that illnesses come about for numerous external and internal reasons according to the individual’s gene mutations, experiences, core wounds, health history, chakra imbalances or karma, chemical exposure, and more. Therefore, the specific diet a person should be eating will vary according to this personalized history. It is why, although I believe there are dietary practices or theories that are in many ways superior to a standard western diet, there is truly no one-sized-fits-all approach. Who you are determines what you should be eating, not the other way around.

This is the standard I have held myself to over the last 8 years while directing clients in comprehensive nutritional plans. You are unique, your diet should be equally unique. Unfortunately, we are saturated with programs, books, classes, and internet experts telling us there is only one perfect diet (Paleo, Autoimmune Paleo, Keto, Vegan, etc etc). Will you trust your body or will you trust these money-making schemes?

Like I said, there are certain nutrition practices I think we should all to a large degree adopt (unless there is a specific contraindication for you personally). Take, for example, the fact that indigenous cultures and peoples instinctively understood things about food that our modern society overlooks and takes for granted: food should be consumed in its whole forms, it should come directly from the earth, it should be organic and unsprayed or not irradiated, and that you should consume what is local and available to you.

Another principle that transcends time and peoples worldwide is the idea that every meal should contain a raw or fermented food that is rich in enzymes. In Eastern Europe, we see this practice as the dollop of sour cream on the soup or the raw butter on toast; in Latino societies, we see it as the unpasteurized alcohol or fresh condiments consumed with food (tepache, chicha, salsas, curtido); in Asian cultures we see it as the fermented vegetables added to meals or used as side dishes (banchan, for example). These traditions are not “primitive”, they are ancient wisdom that should be respected. 

You see, enzymes aide in digestion and not only help your digestive tract to break down foods so they do not end up as inflammatory immune threats, they also help the kidneys and liver in processing foods. Enzymes can also be called life force or energy: they are living and alive and killed by cooking processes. Energy isn’t just about picking up the bad attitudes of others when you walk into a room, it is about what you intake in other ways, including what you eat.

When you eat dead foods, your body has to compensate for the lack of enzymes or water that would normally be found in unprocessed foods. Over time, this creates a deficit that forces your digestive tract, kidneys, and liver to work extra hard. Imagine the consequences of a lifetime of eating foods with no life force. Think back to how many modern meals we eat that are completely dead and devoid of any enzymes: fried potatoes, meats, pizza, pasteurized dairy, roasted vegetables, rice, bread, and on and on. While many of these foods can be healthy when sourced from quality purveyors, or when prepared in certain ways (grass-fed burgers, for example), they are still dead and force your body into an energetic deficit.

Another way I’ve heard “life force” interpreted when it comes to food is this: the kind of food you eat, when, how, and at which pace, affects how you feel afterwards. For example, you will feel differently eating a salad versus a bowl of pasta. One will probably leave you feeling light and energized afterwards, and one will leave you feeling stuffed, lethargic, and ready for a nap. 

In nutrition school, I also learned that coming together for a meal is about more than a social gathering; it is also an exchange of energy between the people sharing the food. Sure, you will get to talk, enjoy the people you are with, and get energized (or, perhaps, brought down) by their personal energy, but you will also end up collectively feeling the same way afterwards if you all eat the same thing. It’s one reason we congregate for meals: to get into a kind of positive groupthink with family or friends. This is in large part due to the fact that if you are sharing one big meal rather than everyone ordering something different so you will likely have similar blood sugar responses, levels of satiety, and therefore the same energy during and afterwards. On the flip side, we also know that having inhibitory responses (ie: getting stressed, nervous, holding back, being ashamed, etc) slows down the thyroid immediately and prevents thyroid hormone from being released, which aides in digestion. Food brings people together for many reasons, and energy is one of them. 

My nutrition school professor also described the energetics of food with this example: a famous and highly sensitive Japanese nutrition expert (a leader in the Macrobiotics movement) was so energetically sensitive he could always feel the energy with which the food he was eating was prepared. So once, a man tried to purposefully trick him to see what his interpretation of the food “energy” would be. This chef danced around the kitchen, clapping his hands, yelling, jumping up and down as he cooked. When the food arrived to the table, the nutrition expert took a few bites and said he was very confused with what had been done to this food. While it tasted delicious, he said the energy was chaotic and crazy and couldn’t understand what had happened while it was cooking. Despite not being in the kitchen while it was cooking, he knew something was “off”.

If you are a highly sensitive person, you may not feel the food life force quite to this degree, but your body will likely internalize it and it could stimulate or sedate you based on who prepared it and the emotion with which it was prepared. Now think about what happens when you go out to eat: the food you’re eating may be prepared by a worker who doesn’t particularly care for their job, slaps the meal together in a hurry with little love or care, and gets it to the table as quickly as possible. It’s one reason home cooked food tastes so good and we crave holiday gatherings or food from the “mother”: most likely, she put her heart and soul into it and prepared it with love.

The takeaway here is that you are an energetic being with constant energetic requirements. You must in-put good energetic sources of food, and be surrounded by positive energy while eating in order to aide the digestive tract and other vital organs. 

Ready to reclaim your health and self? Click here to learn more about Nutrition Consultations, Energy Readings, and Body Readings. 

 

 

Fascia: the mask you live in

Each and every one of us is covered in a thick, complex, tangled web of fascia. Fascia is the connective tissue that sits under your skin and on top of your muscles. On anatomy diagrams, fascia looks like the off-white strings and planes that sit on top of or in lines up and down the muscles. It provides structure and support, helps transport nutrients, helps regulate nervous system function, helps keep you hydrated, helps you maintain a healthy youthful appearance to the skin, and much much more. Some forms of fascia are also known as “scar tissue” because it is considered fibrotic tissue. 

In addition to the physiological roles fascia plays, fascia also keeps your secrets. It collects your memories. It remembers your joys, but largely it stores your traumas. It forces you to live in the pain of the past instead of being able to be present in the moment. Your fascia has kept a record of every time you misused your body, forcing it into bras and cinchers, too-tight jeans, or awkward shoes — and why you did so. It also remembers how often — and to which degree — you’ve smiled, laughed or cried, winced, squinted, questioned, tensed, quieted, forced, sat or walked. It’s the literal, tangible mind-body connection and it is the record keeper of you.

I’ve had clients ask me before, “I know everyone talks about a mind-body connection but I just can’t visualize it. How does it all connect?” I tell them the mind-body connection is the fascia, the connective tissue. Not only can you feel it under your skin with your fingers, you can also see it with the naked eye — constriction or restriction, bulges, tightness, thick skin/”big boned”, cellulite, crepey skin, and asymmetry are all likely fascial distortions. Don’t get me wrong — we need fascia. It is an integral system and structure of the human body and some kinds even support your organs. But most of the obvious fascia people are carrying around these days is full of adhesions, or thickened, jumbled, tangled fascia resultant from trauma to the area (such as accident or surgery), improper use of the area (or surrounding areas), improper diet, dehydration, infection, and in rare cases certain genetic conditions. 

It’s like we become covered in scar tissue of our own making. Let me explain. Let’s say you have an inhibitory throat response such as choosing not to speak, holding back tears, being fearful of making noise or “rocking the boat”. Well, as a result, the surrounding structures (nearby muscles, joints, tendons, etc.) will be used improperly because of the tension. Over time, this physical response becomes your go-to pattern. After years of making those dysfunctional movements, you create asymmetry that changes your fascia, which changes your appearance. It’s a way for your body to compensate and provide structure or balance in the midst of dysfunction. In theory, the more fascial adhesions (jumbled, dysfunctional fascia) you have, the greater the challenges you have faced. Or, the greater the adhesions in a certain area of your body, the greater challenges to that area, both physically and spiritually.

Fascia is the mask we all live in. And fascia never lies because you created it. 

In the case of hypothyroidism, you may notice “thickened” skin around your neck but especially near your thyroid or voice box area. If you try to gently pinch your skin but cannot grab a very small amount — getting only large thickened chunks — it is indicative of fascial adhesions. You should be able to grab just the epidermis layer of your skin without too much resistance from the dermis.

Sure you might have plenty of fascial adhesions on your neck area and be hypothyroid, but how do the fascial adhesions affect, say, your actual thyroid gland? Well, on the surface of the thyroid is a substance called thyroglobulin. It is a protein precursor of thyroid hormone and acts to collect nutrients (such as iodine and tyrosine) from your blood stream and store them on the surface of the thyroid gland. That way, your body readily has nutrients available to it any time it needs to make thyroid hormone. But now imagine on top of your thyroid/thyroglobulin, you have a thick mesh strangling the area, cutting off blood flow, oxygen, and nutrients from entering the area — or only entering very slowly. Suddenly you have a thyroid crisis because that vital gland is not able to receive what it needs to function optimally. Mind-body connection. Now imagine this happening all over your body. 

It gets tricky because fascial adhesions can also extend to other related areas in order to compensate. You see, fascia is like a spider-web sheath covering your entire body from the top of your head to the tip of your toe. It’s all connected so the neck fascia you’ve created from holding back your thoughts or emotions, which is now choking your thyroid gland, then works it way up and extends to the sides of the neck, to your cheeks and face to create the classic hypothyroid “puffy face”, and over the shoulders, creating a thickening there too. Dowager’s Hump or myxedema can develop. And on it goes. 

With fascia it goes like this:

  1. your experiences cause you to generate thoughts/feelings 

  2. your thoughts/feelings create your reality

  3. your reality determines how you are allowed to, are encouraged to, or want to move your body

  4. how you move your body determines which areas develop fascial adhesions

  5. therefore, the areas that contain the most adhesions are the areas where there is a core wound or life lesson that needs to be resolved

I try to infuse most assertions I make to you with an anecdotal story to back it up. I want you to see that the information I share with you isn’t about getting likes, recycling outdated information, repeating the same things everyone else is telling you, etc. I want to share new and innovative information that is affecting you but that you might not have heard before. I share this information with you because it changed my life so dramatically for the better, and I have seen it do the same for my clients. But it’s still hidden. So here’s the story about why I “got into” fascia and why I believe this is the next biggest thing you should know about, if you’re not already intrigued:

I was diagnosed with a “mild” scoliosis in 1997 — a lower-back curvature. I don’t remember the curvature degree at the time of diagnosis (or that anyone even measured it because I was diagnosed by a school nurse), but about 4 years ago, according to an x-ray done by a chiropractor, it was at 24 or 22 degrees. As a child and young adult, I woke up every few nights with spasms in my lower back that startled me awake and gave me nightmares. My back would consistently “go out” and I felt pressure, couldn’t bend in certain ways, and was in aching pain most days. I went to chiropractors on and off over the years since being a teenager and even did some physical therapy and massage, and saw a podiatrist to try to help my back. Though they provided temporary relief, I would always end up feeling the same as before a few days after appointments. 

Then after my daughter was born in 2012, I suffered a near month-to-month string of slipped discs. It went on like this for a couple of years — going to the chiropractor in hopes I wouldn’t re-injure myself, using a decompression table to get the discs to go back into place without surgery (it worked thankfully), trying to stretch and exercise, etc. But nothing really seemed to improve my back issues and pain. Then one day I stumbled upon information about fascia. It was a video of an expert talking about the role of fascia in our health and appearance. I was so intrigued at the idea of using myofascial release to overcome my pain that I started immediately. 

I have been using myofascial release (MFR) for over two years now. For me, it has been an absolute miracle. First, I haven’t had a slipped disc or rib go out of place since using MFR. More importantly though, I have had three chiropractors tell me they can no longer see a scoliosis curvature in my spine. Meaning, I reversed my scoliosis. I’m not saying this is possible every time. What I am saying is that no one had ever offered me another option to help my back pain and no one offered any good answers for why it developed in the first place. I learned that my scoliosis was considered “functional” meaning it could be traced back to something and, therefore, potentially corrected. I believe this is true for many modern health conditions.

That is the power of unraveling your fascia. It’s like a way to work backwards and confront every challenge you’ve stored in your body head on. As you use MFR, your fears and insecurities rise to the surface, the lies and cover-ups rise to the surface, and your true power starts to rise as you let go of the trauma. As an Intuitive, I operate through waves of insight that come to me, well, intuitively, as well as through reading and observation. This was the case with my foray into fascia: I learned the information, applied it and observed the effects, then it just “came” to me: the fascia is the record of your mind-body connection and we’re covered in fascial masks to hide or compensate for the trauma. 

As each fascial layer was peeled away, I was left with questions. Myofascial release on my feet caused my pelvis to flip up and out. I had been walking with my tail literally between my legs for decades. Why had I felt the need to do that? In order to hide. Why did I feel the need to hide? Because of learning disabilities, un-supportive environments, fear of being seen for fear of punishment, extreme religious oppression, etc. You see, fascia holds the answers but you have to ask yourself the questions. Once you start asking the questions, you then begin the process of testing your subconscious mind to see which answer is correct. Once you find the correct answer, you release the emotional attachment or stress response to the corresponding wound. That is how you know it is true. In the process of MFR, you may also clear up stagnant lymph, restricted blood flow, saggy or unhealthy looking skin, trim inches, reduce pain, and have wide range of mobility again. Mind-body connection.

You deserve to know about yourself first and foremost because self-awareness brings healing. You are so unique that no one-sized-fits-all approach will ever work. Think of your fascia like a soul blueprint. It helps to gently illuminate what your fears or weaknesses are in order to improve yourself, helps you get out of the trauma by identifying the toxic cycles in your life, it tells us about the state of your physical health, and once released, it helps you move onto a healthy future instead of clinging to the pain of the past without realizing it.

First, know that there are ways to smooth out the fascia and restore it to its proper function and appearance. Myofascial release, proper hydration (which is about way more than water), essential nutrients for collagen health, liver and lymph support, acupuncture, and more. I come at this from an informational standpoint. I educate my clients on the issues they’re facing then what they can do about it. But there are plenty of ways to do this yourself or with a trained professional. Dysfunctional fascia does not have to be a life sentence. 

Secondly, know that it’s a long process. Imagine decades of your body layering adhesion ontop of adhesion. The process of breaking this down can take years in some cases. So do not get discouraged. Also, will you likely experience detox symptoms physically and emotionally as you retrace the dysfunction, much like a game of connect the dots. But as I always say, if you want to heal, it is worth it and the only way past it is through it. Once you acknowledge what has not worked, you can release it both emotionally and physically in order to get to the root of who you really are without trauma and pain on your body or in your mind. 

If you are interested in learning about your unique fascial adhesions, core wounds, and life lessons, please read about Body Readings